Sunday, August 12, 2007

Rebutia

Rebutia sp.



There are about 60 species in the Rebutia genus. This cactus did not have a species identity when I purchased it, and I have no idea what it is. I think it may be R. minuscule, or Red Crown Cactus, as its flower most closely matches that of the R. minuscule. I have four identified species of Rebutia, and all have similarly shaped flowers but different stems and spines than the one shown here. Therefore, that leaves 56 more species to consider as contenders in the ID game. (Any help with identity is welcomed.)

Rebutia is native to Bolivia and Argentina. Cacti in this genus need strong light, but not direct sunlight, and a well-draining soil. Although recommended for beginning collectors, some find Rebutia hard to grow. I’ve never had any trouble with them. I just water when dry in the summer, and keep them dry in winter. Over watering is the most common reason for Rebutia failure in beginner’s collections. Old habits are hard to break.

Almost all the species in the genus have large, day-blooming flowers that range from a deep red to an orange-yellow color, and the flowers start from the lower part of the cactus stem. There are a few species with white flowers, but they are not easily found in cactus nurseries.

The cacti in the Rebutia genus is generally small in body, so they are most often kept in pots because they would be barely noticeable planted in a garden. In addition, they all require a slightly acidic soil and our desert soil is alkaline, so they wouldn't do well in native soil.

12 comments:

RUTH said...

How beautiful. I do enjoy your posts as you have plants I'd never be able to grow and such lovely photos. Happy GTS :o)

Mark said...

You never cease to suprise me with the beautiful flowers you get on your cactus, another cracker.
Have you sorted out your garden from all the damage you had a while back?

Cheers Mark

farmingfriends said...

What a lovely coloured flower. I didn't realise there were so many beautiful cacti in the world. Thanks for sharing.
Sara from farmingfriends

No Rain said...

Mark,
After a good deal of expense, we were able to get the trees upright and staked, and so far, they seem to be doing ok. The tree people had to heavily prune all of them, so right now, they look bald. Desert trees grow fast with water, so by next year, they'll look good--if they all make it. All the cacti are repotted--that was the easy part. Thanks for asking.

No Rain said...

Sara and Ruth,
Sometimes even I'm amazed at the variety of flowers that are available. They vary from year to year in number, size and color, so it's a constant surprise.
Thanks for visiting.

kate said...

I have one of these! It is currently outside but will soon be returning indoors. Last year, I lost one to frost.

Jean said...

Beautiful bloom! I'm also fascinated by all the cactus blooms. Thanks for sharing them with us!

Beth said...

I think cactus flowers are especially lovely because they are such a contrast to the plant itself. A spiny rough base with such a delicate touch of beauty atop. Your photos show them off beautifully.

Deb said...

Cactus flowers are so beautiful and interesting...thanks for sharing yours!

captain lifecruiser said...

I haven't seen many cactus blooming in real life and certainly not here in Sweden!

I love them because the contrast between the flower and the plant.

Drew said...

A very beautiful desert flower. Excellent.

Ann M. said...

What a great picture! As hot as I'd like to pretend it is here in MD, I'm afraid something like that wouldn't survive. It is so pretty, thanks for posting it :)