Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Baja Fairy Duster Flower

Calliandra californica


The Baja Fairy Duster shrub attracts hummingbirds, butterflies and bees, especially this time of year. Each stamen is tipped with pollen, so I understand why the butterflies and bees like it. I haven't yet figured out why the hummingbirds like it so much because there is nowhere on the flower where they can stick their beaks and draw nectar.

For more information on C. californica, see this previous post.




15 comments:

Jane Marie said...

Unusual and unique looking to me, a Michigander, but I like it.

Nancy J. Bond said...

It really DOES look like a fairy duster! (And well suited to your garden. :)

kate said...

I missed seeing your earlier post about this plant. I wondered how tall it grew ... the flowers are beautiful. I also like the leaves and would love to see a picture of the seed pods.

GardenJoy4Me said...

Aiyana .. it reminds me of those optic lights ? it is so pretty .. I would love to have it in my garden too !
Joy

Tracy said...

That is a really unusual plant. I really like it. You say it is in the pea family.......therefore it isn't a cactus or a succulent? I wonder if it is hardy where I am, that is a really neat plant to have growing. I would love to visit your garden one day......it sounds fantastic, and you have such a cool variety of plants. Have you ever posted pics of your yard? or your garden? I would love to see pics of it!

Donna said...

What a beautiful flower. They look so magical. I'd love to grow some on my balcony.

beckie said...

What a pop of color! It may be that the hummers are just drawn to the red color. I sure am!

The Gardeness said...

The colors on these cactus of yours are beautiful. Do you suppose I could get them to grow here in Seattle?

Andrew said...

I love the Baja Fairy Duster it was one of the first plants I was drawn to upon moving to the valley I have two of the reds in my garden and they are beautiful. The other plant I was drawn to immediately is the Dalbergia Sissoo tree also known as Indian Rosewood. I was on an immediate quest to find out what is was when I got here. I have three in my yard now. I love the amount of shade they produce, they weather the monsoons well, and mostly the contrast of their creamy yellow bark against they're dark colored, aspen like leaves. So many plants to enjoy :-)

Pa Rock's Ramble said...

Do you know anything about the care of Egyptian papyrus? I have some in a large pot and have already learned that it doesn't do well outside on a windy day. Can it survive inside with air conditioning?

Your blog is elegant, and the photograpy is beautiful!

Pa Rock

Julie said...

Hi Aiyana! How are you and your hubby doing? I am thinking the hummingbirds are just attracted to the red color, and they just want to flitter down and TRY to get some nectar...then they have to fly away all sad and degected! LOL. This was a gorgeous shot you got with your camera...it would be lovely on a card!! hint, hint!!!

No Rain said...

I just spent a total of 45 minutes answers all the comments. I did this twice. Both times when I was almost done, my computer suddenly shut down and I lost it all. I'm now frustrated enough to go to bed and do it tomorrow!

Shady Gardener said...

What a great plant! If you have the Emu in your garden with the Eremophila species, this one looks like a Crowned Crane! You are very diverse! ;-)

WiseAcre said...

I agree that it must be the RED that attracts the hummers. I find both the flower and foliage tempting too. I've added the Baja Fairy Duster shrub to my list of "wish I could grow that'

David said...

I have one of these plants also and the hummingbirds love it.... Each puff has 8-10 nectar tubes at the base of it and each tube produces 8-10 of the spikes that create the puff (flower) . The hummers are getting fed... :)I really treasure this plant