Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Hooked



If you let your imagination go, the glassy white circles of radial spines and the reddish brown, hooked central spines bring to mind parasols with curved handles. The arrangement of the spines, along with the bright pink flowers, makes this a beautiful specimen. However, those little hooks can really grab if one is too close.


Just as I predicted, this Mammillaria bombycina produced its first flowers this spring. Unlike many Mammillaria species, the M. bombycina produces flowers only on mature plants that are at least two to four years old. It is now four years old and several of the heads have flowers.


In just a year's time, this cactus has produced many new heads and is quickly filling its container. If I leave it in its current pot, its growth will slow. If I repot it, the cactus will continue to grow rapidly. In the wild, some specimens have up to 50 heads!

8 comments:

Nancy J. Bond said...

I looked this up and its blooms are beautiful! Silken Pincushion, I believe it read, is a common name?

No Rain said...

Hi Nancy,
Yes, that's the common name. I always wonder how plants came to have the common names they have--maybe this one reminded someone of a pin cushion with all the pins sticking out. I can think of 10 different cacti that would better match the name.

beckie said...

Would ove to see this one as your pics are always so pretty, but blogger keeps xing it out. Have tried 2 days. Maybe I can see the next one!

beckie said...

Ah, Today, it let me see it. Beautiful cactus! I love the little hooks.

Cheryl said...

Ah got your photo at last. Tried last night in vain. What a beautiful cacti and your description is absolutely spot on.

verobirdie said...

You are right, they look like mini parasols.

Julie said...

Can you plant it in your yard??? It would be neat to see how big you could get it!!! It sure is gorgeous!!!

No Rain said...

I had to repost the photo. Every once in a while, the photo just disappears. Can't figure out what causes it to be there for a day, and then disappear.

Yes, Julie, this can go into the yard, but it needs light shade here in Phoenix. Most Mamms need light summer shade here.