Tuesday, June 3, 2008

June Desert Garden

This is what part of my garden looks like the first part of June. Many plants need a trimming, but I kind of like a wild look--my desert version of a cottage garden. Soon we will have triple digits every day, and many desert plants go into a state of dormancy as a means to conserve water. My garden then looks dry and scorched, while gardeners in other climates are basking in their verdant gardens. But, just as others are preparing for cold weather, we have a second spring, where everything comes alive and looks beautiful again for a couple of months.



Pedilanthus macrocarpusLady's Slipper

This unusual plant has only a very few tiny leaves on its numerous lime-green stems. Desert gardeners choose this plant because of the stems, which provide a nice contrast among agave and cacti. The stems bear flowers in early summer and again in fall. P. macrocarpus makes a good container plant in warm climates, as well as in desert gardens. The flowers don't look like a lady's slipper to me, but maybe more imaginative folks can see the resemblance.

Parodia magnifica
Ball Cactus


I have two Parodia magnifica in one pot. The first one to bloom had only one flower and I posted that photo recently. Then this second specimen popped these two flowers almost overnight. I didn't even see the buds before this morning.

x Echinopsis 'Rose Quartz'
AKA: Chamaecereus 'Rose Quartz' and Chamaelobivia 'Rose Quartz'

This cactus is called a lot of things, including its common name, Peanut Cactus. This is its second flowering of the season. I may see a couple more flowerings before the extreme heat starts. In the fall, it will start again for a couple of flowerings before it gets too chilly.

12 comments:

PAULE said...

Lovely view of your garden. Thanks for sharing

Paule

Claude said...

That's a beautiful view of your garden... I can grow some of those dessert plants here, but to do a whole garden in them would be a bit challenging, and would probably annoy the neighbors, whom insist on grass lawns. They seem to be under the impression that we are living in Conneticut.

Dawn said...

Amazing blooms!
TFS!!!!

Sugarplum Cottage said...

Love all the bright orange and red colors. Your garden is picture perfect. It is so amazing seeing cactus bloom. Hugs, RoseMarie

Pam/Digging said...

I love your long shots---more please! That Santa Rita prickly pear looks terrific with the orange flowering plants.

Here in Austin, we have similar seasons: a flowery spring and fall, and a hot, scorching summer where many plants just try to hang on---as does the gardener. Obviously, it doesn't get quite as hot here (it's been in the upper 90s with an occasional 100 for the past two weeks, though), and our gardens remain green for the most part. They just don't bloom as much through the summer, and some retreat to small rosettes.

Suzanne said...

I look forward to your posts every week. I am becoming a desert lover through your photos! Love the vibrant colors of the flowers!

Jean said...

Your desert garden is so fascinatiog. I guess I never thought about it before. I am so enjoying learning about your lovley cacti! Beautiful and interesting, as always.

Pudgeduck said...

Beautiful yard! I just love it! Still can't grow cactus like you do!!!

beckie said...

I don't think your garden needs trimming. It's just lovely! The ball cactus has a glorious yellow color and I love the red. Even though I plant mostly pastels, I like the bright colors in others' garden.

Julie said...

I too, love the different colors and textures...it is all just lovely! Don't change a thing! But, I am amazed that you have an unidentified prickly pear ...it sure is pretty!!!

No Rain said...

Julie, read my blog entry, "One Too Many Mysteries For Me" for Sept. 7, 2007 and you'll understand why it's unidentified!

Peter said...

Nice pedilanthus blooms.