Friday, August 20, 2010

Agave victoriae-reginae


Finally, after three years, this Agave is now identifiable as Agave victoriae-reginae. This was another unidentified free offset from a local Cactus and Succulent Society meeting. It was tiny, in fact, even after three years it's only grown to six inches high and wide. I suspected that it was a Queen Victoria, but they seldom offset, so I wasn't positive. The first leaves did not have the typical white coloration. There is a variation called A. victoriae-reginae var. viridis without white but I had never run across one, so I just sat back and waited, and as time went on, Queen Victoria characteristics slowly but surely emerged.

This Agave species is one of the most popular of all the Agaves. They love full sun, but in our climate they need twice a month watering to do well. Although I'm glad this has turned out to be a Queen Victoria, I much prefer the Agave victoriae-reginae 'compacta', which I think is the most beautiful Agave of all. I stop by my old house occasionally and peek though the view fence just to check on that Agave that I left behind. It is now quite large and still perfect. Sigh....

6 comments:

verobirdie said...

I can understand why you were in love with the compacta. Amazing!

mr_subjunctive said...

Is it possible that there could be more offset-prone varieties? Or that they might be more inclined to offset when stressed? I bought one a while back at my former workplace specifically because it had several offsets (3-inch pot, and yet there were a good seven offsets growing in it). Picture here.

I'd attribute it to just a random plant being weird, but when I visited again last Wednesday, I saw another one there.

rohrerbot said...

I love these little guys...

Julie said...

Oh my Goodness Gracious...that "compacta" is so beautiful!!! I would be so happy to go see it as well...I have never seen anything like that before (in real life)! Wow!!!!!!!

Aiyana said...

mr_subjunctive,
Queen Victoria Agave usually offsets sparingly, but I've read that some populations offset heavily. You may have a specimen from one of those populations.
Aiyana

Lythrum said...

I'm glad that you were able to identify it finally. :) I haven't ever been able to visit any of my old gardens, we moved too far away. I would think it would be both interesting and sad to see them. Interesting if they are still there, sad if the new owners didn't take care of my baby. :)